melasma What is it? How Does it Affect your Skin?


Melasma: What is it? How Does it Affect your Skin?

Melasma is a very common skin condition that causes dark brown or grayish-brown patches to appear on your skin. The patches usually form on the cheeks, forehead, nose and chin. While melasma is not harmful, it can be unsightly.

There are three types of melasma:

Epidermal melasma – occurs in the uppermost layer of the skin (epidermis)

Dermal melasma – occurs in the deeper layers of the skin (dermis)

Mixed melasma – a combination of epidermal and dermal melasma

Melasma is a skin condition that causes discoloration on the face. Commonly referred to as the “mask of pregnancy,” this hyperpigmentation is most often associated with females. Because its location is typically on the forehead, cheeks, and chin, it can be very noticeable and obvious to others. While it can affect both men and women, it is more common in women, especially during or after pregnancy.

Causes of Melasma

While the exact cause of melasma is unknown, there are factors that increase your risk.

1. Age–Melasma commonly occurs during reproductive years.

2. Sex–Melasma affects women more than men due to hormonal changes during pregnancy and while taking oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy.

3. Ethnicity–Because melasma is more common in people with darker skin tones (people of Latin American, Asian, Indian, Middle Eastern, and Mediterranean descent), excess pigment (melanin) plays a role in the development of melasma.

Melasma is a common skin condition that causes brown to gray-brown patches, usually on the face. Most people get it on their cheeks, bridge of their nose, forehead, chin, and above their upper lip. It also can appear on other parts of the body that get lots of sun, such as the forearms and neck.

Melasma is thought to be caused by sun exposure, genetics, hormone changes, and skin irritation. While there are many treatment options for melasma, including prescription creams and procedures like chemical peels and laser therapy, many people find that over-the-counter products containing hydroquinone are effective.

A product with hydroquinone is considered to be the gold standard in treating melasma because it works by reducing melanin production in your skin. Melanin is what gives your skin its color. But you have to be careful when using hydroquinone because over time it can cause ochronosis (irreversible darkening of the skin).

How much hydroquinone you need depends on how dark your melasma is. A dermatologist can help you determine what strength would be appropriate for you.

Melasma is a common skin condition that affects many people, especially women. It results in dark and irregularly shaped patches on the face. These patches can be found on the forehead, cheeks, chin, nose and upper lip areas. Melasma is also known as chloasma by some people, particularly those in the medical profession, but generally speaking, it is referred to as melasma.

What causes melasma?

Melasma is caused by increased production of melanin in the skin. Melanin is basically the pigment that gives your skin its color. When there are certain factors that stimulate melanin production in certain areas of the face and body, melasma occurs. The condition may also be hereditary in some cases.

The main factors that trigger melasma include:

* Sun exposure

* Hormonal changes due to pregnancy or oral contraceptives

* Thyroid disease

Other possible but less common triggers of melasma include stress, cosmetics and skincare products that contain harsh chemicals such as hydroquinone and mercury.

Melasma is a skin condition that causes dark patches on the face. This skin problem can affect both men and women, though it is more commonly seen in women. Melasma is also known as chloasma, or the mask of pregnancy, when present in pregnant women. The condition may be referred to as melasma faciei when it occurs on the face.

What causes melasma?

The brownish-gray patches associated with melasma are due to overactivity of melanocytes, the cells responsible for producing pigment (melanin) in the skin. These patches often appear on the cheeks, bridge of nose, forehead, chin and above the upper lip. Melasma may also affect other parts of the body that receive a lot of sun exposure, such as the forearms and neck. In some cases, melasma may fade without treatment after pregnancy or other triggers resolve. However, for most people, melasma is a chronic condition that lasts for years.

Who gets melasma?

Melasma affects about 5 million Americans and Europeans; it is much more prevalent among people with olive or dark complexions (such as Hispanic/Latino Americans). Nearly 90 percent of people with melasma are women; about 10 percent are men. About 50% of

Melasma is a type of hyperpigmentation that causes brown to grey-brown patches to appear on the skin. Melasma is more common in women, and about 90% of melasma cases occur in women. Melasma frequently diminishes after pregnancy, but can persist for years or even be permanent. Thankfully, it can be treated.

Melasma is most common among women during their reproductive years (between 20 and 50), but it can occur at any age. It affects darker skinned people more commonly than lighter skinned people. It usually occurs symmetrically on the cheeks, forehead, chin, upper lip, and nose, but it can also appear on other parts of the body such as the forearms and neck.

The exact cause of melasma is unknown. We do know that it appears to be a result of an overactive production of pigment (melanin) in certain areas of the skin. Researchers believe that hormones may play a role in triggering melasma, which is why women are more likely to develop it during pregnancy or when taking oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy (HRT). While melasma is sometimes referred to as “the mask of pregnancy”, this term is misleading because only about half of all pregnant women get it. Other factors

Melasma is a common skin problem that causes brown to gray-brown patches on the face. Most people get it on their cheeks, bridge of their nose, forehead, chin, and above their upper lip. It also can appear on other parts of the body that get lots of sun, such as the forearms and neck.

Women are much more likely to get melasma than men. In fact, about 9 out of 10 people who have it are women. Pregnant women sometimes get it, too. In this case, it’s called chloasma or “the mask of pregnancy.”

The exact cause of melasma is unknown. However, it’s thought to be triggered by hormonal changes (such as those that occur during pregnancy or with birth control pills) and sun exposure. Other possible triggers include thyroid disease and certain cosmetic products (especially fragrant products).

Melasma often fades on its own after pregnancy or when you stop taking birth control pills. However, it may come back when you’re exposed to the sun or take a medication that affects your hormones. If melasma doesn’t fade on its own or if you want to speed up the process, you’ll need treatment.


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