The Reliable Dentist


There are many different kinds of oral bacteria, and they form a community called the microbiota. The types of microorganisms that live inside your mouth depend on many factors, including your age and the types of foods you eat.

The microbiota helps maintain your health by helping to prevent the growth of harmful microorganisms and by producing substances that protect against other disease-causing organisms. However, certain disease-causing microbes can sometimes become more numerous than beneficial microbes. Such an imbalance of bacteria can lead to infection or inflammation in your mouth.

To help keep your mouth healthy and free of disease, you should practice good oral hygiene, including brushing your teeth twice a day and flossing at least once a day. You should also visit your dentist regularly for cleanings and checkups.

The integumentary system is the organ system that protects the body from various kinds of damage, such as loss of water or abrasion from outside. The system comprises the skin and its appendages (including hair, scales, feathers, hooves, and nails).

The integumentary system has a variety of functions; it may serve to waterproof, cushion and protect the deeper tissues, excrete wastes, and regulate temperature and stores water, fat, and vitamin D.

The skin is the largest organ in the body. For the average adult human, the skin has a surface area of between 1.5-2.0 square metres (16.1-21.5 sq ft) and accounts for about 15% of body weight.[1] It distinguishes not only between friend (not harmful) and foe (harmful), but also differentiates between different dangers such as fire (high temperature) and snake (venomous).

You have probably heard of the integumentary system, but you might not know what it is. The Integumentary System is the body’s largest organ and protects us from injury, infection and dehydration. It consists of the skin, hair, nails and glands.

The skin is made up of two main layers: an outer layer called the epidermis and an inner layer called the dermis. A thick membrane lies beneath the dermis called subcutaneous tissue or hypodermis which lies beneath the skin. The main function of this system is to protect the body from damage such as cuts, scratches and infections from outside sources. It also helps to regulate temperature by sweating and shivering.

The epidermis is only about .05mm to 1.5mm thick and varies in thickness in different areas of your body. The epidermis does not contain any blood vessels which means that it receives oxygen and nutrients from deeper blood vessels in the dermis through diffusion.

The dermis contains blood vessels, nerve endings, sweat glands and hair follicles which are all found in this layer of skin. This layer also contains collagen which gives our skin its elasticity so we can stretch without tearing our skin. Elastin fibers provide strength when stretched out to

The integumentary system is the organ system that protects the body from various kinds of damage, such as loss of water or abrasion from outside. The system comprises the skin and its appendages (including hair, scales, feathers, hooves, and nails).

The integumentary system has a variety of functions; it may serve to waterproof, cushion, and protect the deeper tissues, excrete wastes, and regulate temperature, and is the attachment site for sensory receptors to detect pain, sensation, pressure and temperature. In most terrestrial vertebrates with significant exposure to sunlight, the integumentary system also provides for vitamin D synthesis. The skin is the largest organ in the body.

In humans for example, the primary function of the integumentary system is as a barrier against the external environment. The skin guards the underlying muscles, bones, ligaments and internal organs. One of the main functions of skin is to act as a barrier to infection; its outer surface stops water loss (dehydration) which would enable bacteria to live on our bodies; it prevents entry of microorganisms including bacteria and viruses; its acidity (pH) helps prevent infection.

The integumentary system is the largest organ in the body and consists of the skin, nails, hair, sweat glands, sebaceous glands and other structures. The skin is composed of two layers: the epidermis (which is made of stratified squamous epithelium) and the dermis (which is made of dense irregular connective tissue).

The epidermis is the outer layer of cells that are constantly being shed. The dermis lies below and contains blood vessels, nerve endings, hair follicles, sweat glands and sebaceous glands.

The skin also secretes a chemical called melanin that gives different people their different skin color. This melanin helps protect the body from UV radiation from sunlight.

Sweat glands are coiled tubular glands located throughout the dermis. These are divided into two types: eccrine sweat glands and apocrine sweat glands. Eccrine sweat glands secrete a watery solution containing salt, which helps keep you cool when it evaporates off your body. Apocrine sweat glands are only found in areas with lots of hair follicles like in your scalp or armpits. These secretions contain fatty material that bacteria can digest and use as food causing an odor to be detected by others.

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The integumentary system is the body’s largest organ. It consists of a variety of appendages including hairs, scales, feathers, hooves and nails. The function of these appendages is protection against physical, chemical and biological hazards. In addition there are glands in the skin that produce sweat to regulate body temperature and waste.

The integumentary system also helps to control water loss from the body by functioning as a barrier to prevent the evaporation of water from the skin into the environment. The integumentary system is also the first line of defense for the immune system.

The integumentary system consists of three major subdivisions: 1) skin or cutis 2) hair, nails and glands 3) epidermis and dermis

The integumentary system is composed of the skin, hair and nails. The skin is made up of three layers, the epidermis, the dermis and the hypodermis.

The epidermis consists of five layers, each with its own function. The deepest layer is the stratum basale which contains cells called melanocytes. These cells produce a pigment called melanin which protects underlying cells from UV damage by absorbing radiation and dispersing it throughout the cell as heat.

The next four layers are collectively known as the stratum corneum and are made up of living keratinocyte cells (as opposed to dead keratinocytes in the stratum lucidum). The two innermost layers, stratum granulosum and stratum spinosum contain living keratinocytes that are undergoing apoptosis (programmed cell death). These cells basically commit suicide to protect underlying cells from damage by releasing their contents into the intercellular space where they form a protective barrier against pathogens.

The final layer, stratum lucidum, contains dead keratinocytes which form a protective barrier for underlying tissue.

The second layer, the dermis consists of connective tissue containing capillaries, nerve endings and hair follicles. Cells in this region include


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