What is Acanthosis Nigricans? How To Treat And Prevent It


What is Acanthosis Nigricans?

Acanthosis nigricans is a skin condition characterized by areas of dark, velvety discoloration in body folds and creases. The affected skin may become thickened. Most often, acanthosis nigricans affects your armpits, groin and neck. The condition typically occurs in people who are obese or have diabetes. For unknown reasons, acanthosis nigricans is more common in blacks.

Acanthosis nigricans isn’t harmful, but some forms are associated with an increased risk of diabetes and cancer. Treatment focuses on eliminating an underlying cause and may include prescription creams to lighten the affected skin. In most cases, however, treatment isn’t needed because the affected skin doesn’t cause any symptoms other than its appearance.

Acanthosis nigricans usually begins insidiously and gets worse over time if left untreated. A doctor can usually diagnose acanthosis nigricans by looking at your skin. If necessary, further testing can be done to identify an underlying cause or to distinguish between forms of acanthosis nigricans that can be signs of cancerous conditions.

Causes of acanthosis nigricans

In most people with acanth

Acanthosis Nigricans is a medical condition characterized by dark and thick skin in body folds and creases. The affected skin can also become velvety. The condition mostly affects body parts such as the back of the neck, armpits, groin, and elbows.

The condition is not painful, but it may cause itchiness. Acanthosis nigricans is not contagious and can be treated. However, if left untreated, it may lead to more severe complications.

This article will take you through what acanthosis nigricans is, its causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

Acanthosis nigricans is a skin condition characterized by areas of dark, velvety discoloration in body folds and creases. The affected skin can become thickened. Most often, acanthosis nigricans affects your armpits, groin and neck.

Acanthosis nigricans can affect otherwise healthy people, but it’s often associated with obesity or a family history of the condition. Acanthosis nigricans usually indicates insulin resistance, which can lead to diabetes. Treating the underlying cause usually improves this skin problem.

Acanthosis nigricans is harmless in itself, but it may be associated with other health problems that need medical attention. If you have acanthosis nigricans, see your doctor for an evaluation.

Treatment

Treating the underlying cause of acanthosis nigricans usually improves the appearance of affected skin. Treatment depends on the cause:

Type 2 diabetes — Losing weight and exercising helps improve insulin sensitivity and reduce insulin levels, which should improve your skin’s appearance. Your doctor may prescribe oral medications to help lower your blood sugar if lifestyle changes aren’t enough.

Certain medications — Stopping certain drugs may reverse acanthosis nigricans caused by them. Your doctor

What is Acanthosis Nigricans?

Acanthosis nigricans is a skin condition characterized by areas of dark, velvety discoloration in body folds and creases. The affected skin can become thickened. Most commonly, acanthosis nigricans affects your armpits, groin and neck. However, it can also develop in other body areas.

The condition develops when your body produces too much insulin. Obesity and type 2 diabetes are the most common causes of excess insulin production. Women who have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which can increase insulin levels, may be at higher risk of developing the condition. Acanthosis nigricans is also associated with certain genetic disorders.

Although acanthosis nigricans is a cosmetic concern for some people, it’s usually a sign of an underlying medical condition that requires treatment. If you have acanthosis nigricans, talk to your doctor about ways to control insulin levels and manage symptoms.

Acanthosis nigricans is a skin condition characterized by areas of dark, velvety discoloration in body folds and creases. The affected skin can become thickened. Although the condition is harmless, it may cause embarrassment and be a sign of an underlying medical problem, especially if it occurs in an adolescent or young adult. Acanthosis nigricans most often affects body areas where skin rubs together, such as the groin and armpits. It also can occur on the sides of fingers and toes, around the neck or on the elbows. It’s important to determine what’s causing your acanthosis nigricans so that you can receive appropriate treatment. If you’re overweight or obese, weight loss may reduce or eliminate the discolored patches. For some people with certain health conditions, medications may help improve acanthosis nigricans.

Acanthosis nigricans is a skin condition that causes the skin to thicken and darken in certain areas. It is most often found on the neck, armpits and other creases of the body. Its color varies from light brown to black, and it usually occurs in people who are overweight or obese.

Although it isn’t dangerous, acanthosis nigricans can be frustrating for those who have it. It can occur at any age, but most often develops during adolescence. The condition can be hereditary, or it may develop due to medications or disease.

In children, acanthosis nigricans is typically treated by treating any underlying conditions that may cause it, such as diabetes or an overactive thyroid. In adults, if weight loss doesn’t help treat the condition, hormonal creams are often prescribed. If those don’t work, some doctors recommend vitamin B3 supplements for their patients with acanthosis nigricans.

Cancer is a disease that occurs when uncontrolled division of abnormal cells in the body occurs. Acanthosis nigricans is a skin condition characterized by dark, thick, velvety skin in body folds and creases.

Acanthosis nigricans can be associated with endocrine disorders or malignancy. The appearance of Acanthosis nigricans provides clues to the presence of associated diseases, such as diabetes mellitus or cancer. There are two main types of Acanthosis nigricans; primary (idiopathic) and secondary. Secondary Acanthosis nigricans may be related to endocrine disorders (e.g., insulin resistance), obesity, drugs (e.g., nicotinic acid), or cancer.

The disorder is often found in people who have insulin resistance (prediabetes) or diabetes mellitus, or in those who are overweight or obese. However, it can be seen in anyone, from infants to adults and from normal weight to morbidly obese people. It may be genetic or acquired (such as in cases of obesity). It may also develop alongside some types of cancer, particularly stomach cancer and ovarian cancer.


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