What is Skin? A blog about skin and what it is made up of.


Skin is the largest organ of the body, with a total area of about 20 square feet. The skin protects us from microbes and the elements, helps regulate body temperature, and permits the sensations of touch, heat, and cold. Skin has three layers:

The epidermis, or outermost layer, provides a waterproof barrier and creates our skin tone. The dermis, or middle layer of skin, contains tough connective tissue, hair follicles, and sweat glands. The deeper subcutaneous tissue (hypodermis) is made of fat and connective tissue.

The color of skin is created by special cells called melanocytes, which produce the pigment melanin. Melanocytes are located in the epidermis. The more melanin produced by melanocytes, the darker is your complexion.*

Skin, in anatomy, is a soft layer of tissue forming the outer covering of the body. The skin sits immediately beneath the subcutaneous tissue, and protects it from injury and infection.

The skin is composed of three layers: the epidermis, the dermis and the subcutaneous fat. These layers are made up of different types of cells.

The epidermis, which is the topmost layer, contains four main types of cell: keratinocytes, which produce keratin; melanocytes, which produce melanin; Langerhans cells, which are part of the immune system; and Merkel cells, associated with sensory nerves.

The dermis contains hair follicles, sweat glands and other structures involved in regulating temperature and touch sensation. It also contains blood vessels that nourish the skin.

The subcutaneous layer has large numbers of fat cells that help to protect the body from heat loss and injury.

In places such as on palms or soles there are no hair follicles or sebaceous glands under the epidermis because friction would damage these structures if present. In these sites the epidermis is thicker than normal with extra layers of keratinocytes that accumulate due to constant pressure or rubbing (calluses).

Skin is made up of two layers: the epidermis and the dermis.

The epidermis is the outermost layer of skin, which is made up of dead cells called keratinocytes. The epidermis is further divided into five sublayers, or strata:

The stratum corneum: This is the top layer of the epidermis that you see when you look at your skin. It’s a protective layer composed of dead cells. The cells in this layer are constantly being shed and replaced by cells from below, which rise to the surface of the skin.

The stratum lucidum: This is a thin, clear layer of dead cells that can only be seen with a microscope. The stratum lucidum is located just below the stratum corneum and is found only in thick skin on your palms, soles, and fingertips.

The stratum granulosum: This layer contains many granules that contain important proteins that help keep water in your body from evaporating through your skin. In addition, these granules release enzymes that digest tissue and help new skin grow from underneath.

The stratum spinosum: In this layer (also known as the prickle cell layer), you will find

Skin is the soft outer covering of vertebrates. Other animal coverings, such as the arthropod exoskeleton, have different developmental origin, structure and chemical composition. The adjective cutaneous means “of the skin” (from Latin cutis, skin). In mammals, the skin is an organ of the integumentary system made up of multiple layers of ectodermal tissue, and guards the underlying muscles, bones, ligaments and internal organs. Skin of a different nature exists in amphibians, reptiles, and birds. All mammals have some hair on their skin, even marine mammals like whales, dolphins, and porpoises which appear to be hairless. The skin is the first line of defense from external factors. For example, the skin plays a key role in protecting the body against pathogens and excessive water loss. Its other functions are insulation, temperature regulation, sensation and vitamin D production. Severely damaged skin may heal by forming scar tissue. This is sometimes discoloured and depigmented.

In humans for example, the skin is between 0.5 mm to 4 mm thick depending on the body location (the back being thicker than e.g., eyelids). The average square inch of skin holds 650 sweat glands, 20 blood vessels,

Skin is the soft outer covering of vertebrates. Other animal coverings, such as the arthropod exoskeleton, have different developmental origin, structure and chemical composition. The adjective cutaneous literally means “of the skin” (from Latin cutis, skin). In mammals, the skin is an organ of the integumentary system made up of multiple layers of ectodermal tissue, and guards the underlying muscles, bones, ligaments and internal organs. Skin of a different nature exists in amphibians, reptiles, and birds. All mammals have some hair on their skin, even marine mammals like whales, dolphins, and porpoises which appear to be hairless. The skin is the first line of defense from external factors. For example, the skin plays a key role in protecting the body against pathogens and excessive water loss. Its other functions are insulation, temperature regulation, sensation, synthesis of vitamin D and the protection of vitamin B folates. Severely damaged skin will try to heal by forming scar tissue. This is often discolored and depigmented.

In humans for example, the skin is the largest organ in the body by weight and covers 1.5-2m2 . It protects against heat loss, ultraviolet ray damage (by producing

Skin is the body’s largest organ. It covers the entire outside of the body and is made up of two layers: the epidermis (outer layer) and the dermis (inner layer).

Skin protects against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection. Skin also helps control body temperature and stores water, fat, and vitamin D. The skin has many nerves that make it sensitive to touch, heat, cold, and pain.

Skin has three main functions:

Protection

Using sweat glands in your skin as a cooling system

The skin also protects us from:

Bacteria – an organism that causes disease

Viruses – microorganisms that cause disease

Fungi – organisms that live on dead tissue

Sunlight – strong sunlight can damage the skin causing sunburn and in extreme cases even skin cancer

The skin is the largest organ in the human body and performs many vital functions. It not only protects you from the outside world, but it is a vital part of your immune system.

The skin is also an important part of how people perceive you. The health, appearance and texture of your skin can affect how you feel about yourself and how others see you.

The skin has three layers, each of which has a distinct function:

-Epidermis, which provides waterproofing and serves as a barrier to infection

-Dermis, which contains tough connective tissue, hair follicles, and sweat glands

-Subcutaneous fatty tissue, which insulates from heat and cold

Skin color depends on the presence of melanin in the epidermis. Melanin is a dark brown to black pigment occurring in the hair, skin, and iris of the eye in people and animals. The epidermis also contains cells called melanocytes that produce melanin. When these cells become damaged or unhealthy, it affects melanin production. This can lead to vitiligo (white patches on the skin), as well as other skin conditions such as freckles and age spots.


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