What to Know About Squamous Cell Carcinoma? A blog about squamous cell carcinoma to inform and educate users.


Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common type of skin cancer after basal cell carcinoma. It’s important to be aware of the signs and symptoms of SCC, so you can identify it early. The good news is that when found early, SCC is highly treatable.

SCC generally appears as a firm red nodule, often with a rough, scaly surface that can bleed easily when scraped. It can also appear as an open sore with a raised border and a crusted surface. It often occurs on areas of skin frequently exposed to the sun, such as the ears, face, lips, back of the hands and arms.

In addition to being able to recognize the signs and symptoms of SCC, it’s important to know your risk factors for developing this condition. Risk factors for developing SCC include:

– Fair skin

– History of considerable sun exposure or sunburns

– Having had other types of skin cancer in the past

– Excessive ultraviolet (UV) light exposure from tanning beds

– Exposure to chemicals such as arsenic or coal tar

– Using tobacco products

Squamous cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer. It is the second most common skin cancer, after basal cell carcinoma. It can develop on any part of your body, but it’s most commonly found on areas frequently exposed to the sun, such as your face, mouth, ears and hands.

Squamous cell carcinoma is usually curable if it’s detected early. However, it can be aggressive and invasive if allowed to grow for too long.

Squamous cell carcinoma is the second-most common form of skin cancer, and it is also one of the most preventable. It begins in the squamous cells, which are the thin, flat cells that make up most of your skin’s outer layer. Most cases occur in areas that receive a lot of sun exposure, such as your head, neck, and arms. While it’s less common for squamous cell carcinoma to spread to other parts of your body than melanoma, it can be deadly if not treated. There are a number of different ways to treat squamous cell carcinoma so don’t delay if you think you’re showing signs of this type of cancer.

What are the symptoms? How do I know if I have squamous cell carcinoma? If you have any spots or sores on your skin that won’t heal after a few weeks or months or have gotten worse over time it could be a sign of squamous cell carcinoma. Other symptoms include:

A sore that bleeds easily

A sore that crusts over or scabs but does not go away

A sore that gets small then larger again

A sore surrounded by redness or inflammation

A sore with a smooth surface and elevated borders

If you notice any changes

Squamous cell carcinoma is a form of skin cancer that begins in the squamous cells, which make up the middle and outer layers of the skin. Squamous cell carcinoma is a common form of skin cancer. It is most often seen in people with fair skin and occurs on areas of sun-exposed skin.

Unlike other types of skin cancer, squamous cell carcinoma can spread to other parts of the body if not treated early.

What causes squamous cell carcinoma?

Squamous cell carcinoma occurs from long-term exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from natural sunlight or artificial sources, such as tanning beds. People who have light-colored hair and eyes and freckles are more likely to get it because natural pigment in their skin does not protect them from UV radiation.

Other factors that may put you at risk for squamous cell carcinoma include:

having a family history of this type of cancer

being exposed to coal tar, arsenic compounds, or radiation

having a weakened immune system caused by organ transplant drugs, chemotherapy, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection

What is Squamous Cell Carcinoma? Squamous cell carcinoma, also known as SCC, is a type of skin cancer that begins in the squamous cells, which form part of the middle and outer layers of the skin. It may appear as a firm, red nodule on the sun-exposed areas of the skin, such as the ears, face, lips, and back of the hands. This type of skin cancer can spread to other organs if left untreated.

Squamous cell carcinomas rarely metastasize (spread) beyond the original tumor site; however they can be aggressive locally and can grow deep into surrounding tissues. The cancer can also recur after it is treated. The outlook for people with this disease depends on many factors including how deeply it has penetrated into nearby tissue and whether it has spread to lymph nodes or other organs in the body. Untreated squamous cell carcinoma may become disfiguring or even deadly.

Risk Factors: Although squamous cell carcinoma is most common among people with fair skin who live in sunny climates or at high altitudes, anyone can develop this type of skin cancer. Risk factors include:

UV Light Exposure: The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) light damages your skin’s DNA. This

Squamous cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer. It starts in the squamous cells, which are thin, flat cells that make up the surface of the skin.

Squamous cell carcinoma is also called epidermoid carcinoma.

The majority of squamous cell carcinomas occur on areas of the body that are exposed to the sun. They can also develop in areas that have been injured or have had inflammation for a long time.

People with light colored skin have a higher risk for this type of cancer than those with darker skin. Squamous cell carcinomas are less common than basal cell carcinomas, but they are more likely to spread to other parts of the body (metastasize).

Your doctor will examine your skin and may use a biopsy to find out if your growth is a squamous cell carcinoma or another type of growth. Treatment often involves removing the affected area with surgery or freezing it with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery).

Squamous cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer that develops in the squamous cells, which are the thin, flat cells that make up the outermost part of the skin. It is also known as keratinocyte carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma often occurs on areas that are most exposed to the sun, including the ears, face and lips.

The most common form of skin cancer, squamous cell carcinoma often develops from cumulative exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from sunlight or tanning beds. The risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma increases with age. Anyone can develop squamous cell carcinoma, but it is more common in people who have fair skin; weak immune systems; or have a history of frequent sunburns, especially during childhood.

Treatment options vary depending on the size and location of the lesion as well as other factors. Treatment may include:

* Cryosurgery—a procedure that uses liquid nitrogen to freeze and destroy abnormal tissue

* Curettage and electrodesiccation—a procedure that removes a tumor by scraping it away with a sharp instrument (curette) and then cauterizing (burning) the wound

* Mohs micrographic surgery—a specialized surgery used to treat


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.