Defending Against An Attack


The integumentary system is an organ system consisting of the skin, hair, nails, and exocrine glands. The skin is only a few millimeters thick yet is by far the largest organ in the body. The average person’s skin weighs 10 pounds and has a surface area of almost 20 square feet.

The skin has multiple layers of ectodermal tissue and guards the underlying muscles, bones, ligaments and internal organs. One of its main functions is to act as a barrier against the external environment. For example, the skin plays a key role in protecting the body against pathogens and excessive water loss. Its other functions are insulation, temperature regulation, sensation, synthesis of vitamin D, and the protection of vitamin B folates.[1] Severely damaged skin may heal by forming scar tissue. This is sometimes discoloured and depigmented

The integumentary system comprises the skin and its appendages acting to protect the body from various kinds of damage, such as loss of water or damages from outside.[2] The integumentary system provides not only mechanical protection but also acts as a barrier to infection[3][4] by entrapping harmful microbes within a layer of lipids secreted by its sebaceous glands.[5] In most

The integumentary system is the organ system that protects the body from various kinds of damage, such as loss of water or abrasion from outside. The system comprises the skin and its appendages[clarification needed] including hair, scales, feathers, hooves, and nails.

One can say it is the shield or barrier of our body. It protects us from germs and keeps us safe from getting sick. It also keeps our vital organs in place and protects them from being damaged.

The integumentary system is an organ system consisting of the skin and its appendages acting to protect the body from various kinds of damage, such as loss of water or damages from outside. The integumentary system has a variety of functions; it may serve to waterproof, cushion and protect the deeper tissues, excrete wastes, and regulate temperature, and is the attachment site for sensory receptors to detect pain, sensation, pressure and temperature. In most terrestrial vertebrates with significant exposure to sunlight, the integumentary system also provides for vitamin D synthesis. The skin is the largest organ in the body.

The skin has three layers:

The epidermis, which provides waterproofing and serves as a barrier to infection.

The dermis, which serves as a location for the appendages.

The hypodermis, which provides insulation.

Integumentary organs include hair and nails. There are two types of glands in the integumentary system: oil producing glands (sebaceous glands) that keep hair and skin soft and moist and sweat glands that produce perspiration. The perspiration helps regulate body temperature.

Your skin is the largest organ in your body. It’s made up of two layers: the epidermis and the dermis. It does a lot more than keep your insides in, it also keeps germs out! It acts as a protective layer between your vulnerable inside parts and the big bad world.

Your skin is home to all kinds of bacteria that protect you from germs and fungus. Skin that’s injured or burned becomes extra vulnerable to infection, so it’s important to keep those wounds clean until they heal.

The epidermis, or outer layer of skin, is thin and tough. It protects you against the environment and helps you regulate your body temperature. The dermis, or inner layer of skin, is thicker, but still flexible. The dermis contains blood vessels, nerves, oil glands and sweat glands that help keep your skin soft.

Your skin is not only tough, but it’s also constantly renewing itself! As you get older, your skin renews itself more slowly. That’s why older people often have thinner skin than younger people-and why their cuts take longer to heal!

The integumentary system is an organ system consisting of the skin and its appendages acting to protect the body from various kinds of damage, such as loss of water or damages from outside. The integumentary system has a variety of functions; it may serve to waterproof, cushion and protect the deeper tissues, excrete wastes, and regulate temperature, and is the attachment site for sensory receptors to detect pain, sensation, pressure and temperature. In most terrestrial vertebrates with significant exposure to sunlight, the integumentary system also provides for vitamin D synthesis. The skin is the largest organ in the body.

This system is your body’s shield from the outside world, providing protection from ultraviolet radiation, extremes of temperature and physical trauma. It also prevents water loss, produces hormones and vitamin D, and houses sensory receptors that help you feel pain, pressure, heat and cold.

The integument includes your skin (cutis), hair (pili) and nails (unguae). This protective layer is the largest organ of the body. Skin is made primarily of two things: protein and fat.

Three types of cells are found in the skin:

•Epidermal cells form the outer covering of the skin.

•Dermis: The inner layer contains blood vessels, nerves, hair follicles, sweat glands and sebaceous glands. Sebaceous glands produce oil to keep your skin soft. Sweat glands release perspiration to cool your body by evaporation.

•Hypodermis (also known as subcutaneous layer): The deepest layer contains fat cells that serve as insulation against heat loss.

The integumentary system includes the skin and the skin derivatives hair, nails, and glands. The skin is only about 1/6 inch thick yet is the largest organ in the body.

The skin has two primary layers: the epidermis, which provides waterproofing and serves as a barrier to infection, and the dermis, which serves as a location for the appendages of the skin.


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