The Definitive Guide to Folliculitis


The Definitive Guide to Folliculitis: A blog about the causes and treatment of folliculitis

Folliculitis is a common skin condition in which hair follicles become inflamed. It’s usually caused by a bacterial or fungal infection. At first it may look like small red bumps or white-headed pimples around hair follicles — the tiny pockets from which each hair grows.

The condition isn’t contagious. Often it can be easily treated with over-the-counter (OTC) medications, but sometimes it requires prescription antifungals or antibiotics. Besides being cosmetically irritating, folliculitis can cause permanent hair loss and scarring if left untreated.

While folliculitis can affect anyone at any age, people who tend to get frequent breakouts are those with certain conditions that weaken the immune system or damage the skin, such as diabetes or acne. Other risk factors include:

injuries to the skin, such as abrasions and insect bites

friction from clothing, shaving, waxing and other hair removal methods

tight clothing that traps sweat against the skin

stress

excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis)

What does folliculitis look like?

Folliculitis

Folliculitis is an infection of the hair follicle. The infection can involve the skin of any part of the body that has hair. Usually, it appears as small red bumps or white-headed pimples around hair follicles — the tiny pockets from which each hair grows. The bumps may be painful, itchy or both.

Common sites for folliculitis include your:

Arms, Legs and buttocks

Scalp

Beard area, if you’re a man who shaves

When folliculitis affects the scalp, it can be mistaken for another common scalp infection called seborrheic dermatitis (dandruff). Folliculitis is more likely to occur on inflamed skin that has tiny breakouts or rashes, such as acne or dermatitis.

The condition isn’t contagious and usually clears up in a few days with basic home care. But sometimes it becomes an ongoing (chronic) problem that’s difficult to treat. In some cases, folliculitis can lead to scarring or changes in skin color.

What is Folliculitis?

Folliculitis is the inflammation of hair follicles caused by bacterial or fungal infection. It can cause itching, pain and pimples on the skin. The areas mostly affected are the back, chest, arms, buttocks and legs.

Folliculitis may be a mild condition which can clear up without any treatment. However, it may be severe enough to need medical attention. Folliculitis can occur anywhere on the body though it is most common on areas where hair grows such as the scalp or beard area.

The signs and symptoms of Folliculitis include:

-White heads at the base of hair follicles

-Small red bumps that may develop into pus-filled blisters

-Itchy skin

Folliculitis is a condition where one or more hair follicles are inflamed. This common skin complaint can be caused by infection, irritation, blockages or injury to the hair follicle.

The most common symptoms of folliculitis include:

– Pimples that appear around hair follicles

– Red bumps (papules) or white-headed pimples (pustules)

– Itchy skin

– Swollen or tender skin

– Scaling skin

– Crusty patches of skin

Folliculitis may occur anywhere on the body except the palms of hands and soles of feet. The most commonly affected areas are:

– Scalp (scalp folliculitis), legs, buttocks and groin (barber’s itch), face (hot tub folliculitis), back, chest and abdomen.

Folliculitis is a skin condition where hair follicles get infected. It’s also sometimes referred to as razor bumps. While it looks unpleasant, folliculitis is not dangerous and can be easily treated at home.

There are several things that cause folliculitis. The most common one is shaving. Other causes include:

– Tight clothing

– Sweating

– Friction

– Bug bites

– Clogged pores (due to makeup or oil)

Folliculitis can be found anywhere on the body but it’s most common on places like the beard area and legs.

Folliculitis is a common skin condition in which hair follicles become inflamed. It’s usually caused by a bacterial or fungal infection. At first it may look like small red bumps or white-headed pimples around hair follicles — the tiny pockets from which each hair grows. The infection can spread and turn into nonhealing, crusty sores.

Folliculitis isn’t life-threatening, but it can be uncomfortable and unsightly. Usually the hair grows back after the inflammation goes away. But sometimes the follicle is permanently damaged and stops producing hair.

A mild case of folliculitis can clear up on its own without treatment. But if you have large patches of inflamed follicles or if they’re on your face, you should see your doctor. You may need an oral antibiotic to clear up a severe or recurring infection.

Folliculitis isn’t contagious; you can’t catch it from another person, and you can’t pass it to someone else.

Folliculitis is a skin condition that causes small red bumps to form around the hair follicles. The bumps are often filled with pus. They may cause itching or pain.

Folliculitis can be either superficial or deep. Superficial folliculitis is an infection of the hair follicle that causes a rash with pimples on the skin surface, while deep folliculitis is an infection of the hair follicle that causes a rash with deeper, pus-filled pimples.

Folliculitis usually heals on its own in a few days or weeks and usually doesn’t cause scarring-although it can sometimes leave permanent marks if it gets infected, becomes inflamed, or spreads beyond the hair follicle. It can also cause mild itching or burning, but these are usually mild symptoms that go away within a few days after treatment begins.

Superficial Folliculitis

Superficial folliculitis is more common than deep folliculitis and tends to be more serious and longer lasting than deep folliculitis because the inflammation isn’t as deep inside the skin and doesn’t spread as much as deep acne does. It’s most often caused by the bacterium Staphylococ


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