The Dermis what it is and what it does


The Dermis is a layer of skin. It is responsible for the pigment of your skin and also the hair that grows from it.

The dermis is also responsible for sweating and oiling of the skin.

The dermis is made up of connective tissue and nerve fibers as well as blood vessels, sweat glands and oil glands.

The dermis is the layer of skin that protects the underlying tissue. It contains hair follicles, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands.

The dermis is made up of:

Collagen – a protein found throughout the body. In the dermis, it forms a net-like structure that holds everything together. Elastic fibres – these keep the skin flexible and resilient. They allow it to stretch and return to its normal shape even after being stretched a long way. Around the hair follicles are tiny muscles that help move hairs so they can trap dust or other particles that may be harmful. This is called ‘shuddering’.

The dermis also contains lymph vessels, blood vessels and nerve endings that allow you to feel pain, temperature and pressure.

The dermis is one of the two layers of skin, the other being the epidermis. The dermis is an inner layer and it is made up of connective tissue. The dermis contains fibroblasts, blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, nerves and hair follicles. The dermis forms a protective barrier against mechanical stress and ultraviolet radiation and helps to regulate body temperature.

The dermis contains nerves which allow us to feel things like heat and cold. It also contains sweat glands which secrete sweat onto the surface of the skin through ducts called sudoriferous ducts. Our hair follicles are also located in the dermis. Blood vessels in the dermis supply nutrients to our cells and carry away waste products from them. We also have lymph vessels in our dermis which carry lymph throughout our body. Lymphatic vessels are important because they transport white blood cells around our body. White blood cells help us fight off diseases like infections so it is essential that we have these lymphatic vessels in our body.

The dermis is one of the two layers of skin. The dermis has a very important function as it gives the skin its strength. The dermis is also responsible for the elasticity of the skin and is responsible for the water-retaining function of the skin.

The dermis contains blood vessels, nerves and lymph vessels, sweat glands and hair follicles. In addition, the dermis contains nerve endings that make you feel pain, pressure or heat. The special structure of the nerves in the skin means that you can feel more than just pain, pressure or heat: you can also feel tickling and itching through your nerves.

The dermis consists of two layers: an upper layer (the papillary layer) and a lower layer (the reticular layer).

The dermis is a layer of skin between the epidermis and subcutaneous tissues, that consists of connective tissue and cushions the body from stress and strain. The dermis is tightly connected to the epidermis by a basement membrane. It also harbors many Mechanoreceptors that provide the sense of touch and heat. It contains the hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, apocrine glands, lymphatic vessels, nerves, and blood vessels.The dermis is composed of three major types of cells: fibroblasts, macrophages, and leucocytes. The ß-propeller protein is found in the dermis as well as on endothelial cells in blood vessels (Clayton et al., 2005).

The dermal layer functions to relay sensory information to the epidermal layer through mechanoreceptors. In addition to its dermal function, the dermal layer serves as a reservoir for the storage of water and nutrients. Blood capillaries are found beneath the epidermis, and are linked to an arteriole and a venule. Arterial shunt vessels may bypass the network in ears and nose. The arterioles provide nourishment and waste removal for outer layers

The dermis is the “true skin”, the layer of skin beneath the epidermis that consists mostly of connective tissue and cushions the body from stress and strain. The dermis is tightly connected to the epidermis by a basement membrane. It also harbors many Mechanoreceptors that provide the sense of touch and thermoreceptors that provide the sense of heat. It contains the hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, apocrine glands, lymphatic vessels, nerves, blood vessels and blood capillaries. The blood vessels in the dermis provide nourishment and waste removal from its own cells as well as from the Stratum basale of the overlying epidermis.

The dermis is structurally divided into two areas: a superficial area adjacent to the epidermis, called the papillary region, and a deep thicker area known as the reticular region. The papillary region is composed of loose areolar connective tissue. This is named for its fingerlike projections called papillae (not to be confused with nipples), which extend toward the epidermis. The papillae provide the dermis with a “bumpy” surface that interdigitates with bumps on the epidermal

The dermis is the layer of skin beneath the epidermis that consists of connective tissue and cushions the body from stress and strain. The dermis is tightly connected to the epidermis by a basement membrane. It also harbors many Mechanoreceptors that provide the sense of touch and heat. It contains the hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, apocrine glands, lymphatic vessels, nerves, and blood vessels. The blood vessels in the dermis provide nourishment and waste removal from its own cells as well as from the Stratum basale of the epidermis.

The dermis is structurally divided into two areas: a superficial area adjacent to the epidermis, called the papillary region, and a deep thicker area known as the reticular region. The papillary region is composed of loose areolar connective tissue. This is named for its fingerlike projections called papillae. The papillae provide the dermis with a “bumpy” surface that interdigitates with the epidermis, strengthening their connection. The reticular region lies deep in the papillary region and is usually much thicker. It is composed of dense irregular connective tissue, and receives its name from the thickened fibers


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