The Ring of Truth


When I first started this blog, I had no idea that my biggest challenge would be getting people to listen. I wish I could say that was because of the importance of my message, but let’s face it: most people aren’t interested in hearing about how important it is to wear shoes.

This is a shame. According to the World Health Organization, over 1.2 billion people lack access to adequate footwear. This has serious health consequences: the WHO estimates that over 2 million people are disabled or killed each year by diseases caused by bare feet, such as ring worm and athlete’s foot.

Fortunately, there is a solution! My company, Ring of Truth Footwear, has recently introduced a cheap and reliable line of footwear specifically designed for low-income populations. The shoes are made from recycled tires, so they’re tough and durable as well as waterproof and affordable. If you’d like to help out by donating money or time, please contact me at kevin@ringoftruthfootwear.com

1.

If you’re like me, you’ve always enjoyed the thrill of going barefoot. The feel of the grass on your feet, the sand beneath your toes, and the breeze through your hair — these are some of the best things about living in Southern California. But times change, and it’s important that we change with them.

2.

I used to run around without shoes for hours at a time without any problems; but then one day I noticed a strange rash on my foot. At first I didn’t think much of it; but when it wouldn’t go away after a few days, I started to get worried. So I went to see a doctor — and that’s when I found out I had ringworm!

3.

Ringworm is a disease caused by a fungus called tinea pedis. It can be transferred from person to person or from animals to people, and causes patches of skin to become red, itchy, and inflamed. It usually clears up within two weeks when treated with antifungal cream, but it can come back if you don’t take precautions like wearing shoes around places where other people might have had ringworm (like gyms or pools).

4.

It was hard

I was recently diagnosed with tinea pedis, more commonly known as “athlete’s foot.” When I asked my doctor what caused the condition, he told me it was a fungus that grows in moist, warm environments. I immediately recognized this as an important piece of health information and felt that it would be imprudent not to share it with you, the reader.

The fungus that causes athlete’s foot is often found in locker rooms and public pools, and can be contracted from wet surfaces such as shower floors or even damp towels. Athlete’s foot can be easily prevented by wearing footwear in these situations.

I realize that the idea of wearing shoes in the shower might seem strange to some of you out there, but consider this: The same fungus that causes athlete’s foot also causes jock itch and ring worm. So not only will wearing shower shoes protect your feet from fungus, they’ll also protect your groin. You can’t put a price on that!

What are the benefits of wearing shoes?

Many of us wear shoes every day, but how many of us take the time to stop and think about why we wear them? Do you know that there is evidence to suggest that shoes were worn as early as 4000 BC. You’ll be surprised when you read about the reasons that our ancestors wore shoes.

1. Protection from weather and rough terrain

2. Protection from harmful parasites and insects

3. Better grip on slippery surfaces

4. Maintain optimum temperature for feet

Athletes foot is a fungal infection of the feet which can actually be transmitted from person to person. People with Athlete’s Foot have a tendency to spread the infection by scratching their feet and then walking barefoot on shared surfaces. While most commonly occurring on the webbing between your toes, Athlete’s Foot can also target the soles of your feet and sometimes even your nails. These symptoms include itching, burning, peeling skin, and inflammation.

Tinea pedis (aka ring worm of the foot) is more commonly known as athlete’s foot. According to the Mayo Clinic, “athlete’s foot (tinea pedis) is a common fungal infection of the feet and/or toes.”

Athletes foot is a fungal infection of the feet which can actually be transmitted from person to person. People with Athlete’s Foot have a tendency to spread the infection by scratching their feet and then walking barefoot on shared surfaces. While most commonly occurring on the webbing between your toes, Athlete’s Foot can also target the soles of your feet and sometimes even your nails. These symptoms include itching, burning, peeling skin, and inflammation.

Tinea pedis (aka ring worm of the foot) is more commonly

Ring worm is a fungal infection that can present itself in many different forms, but typically it appears as a red and itchy ring. The fungus is normally spread through direct skin-to-skin contact, or through sharing clothing or even sports equipment.

Although most common in children, ring worm can affect anyone at any time. So what are the signs to watch out for?

The first sign to look out for is an itchy rash on the skin. The rash will form into a red and scaly ring that may blister, weep or become scaly. It’s important to note that not all rashes that form rings are ringworm. Other conditions such as eczema, psoriasis and contact dermatitis may also cause rashes. It’s good to know that ringworm rashes do not tend to be painful (as opposed to poison ivy which can also form into a ring).

If you are concerned about your symptoms you should seek medical advice from your doctor who will be able to correctly identify whether you have ringworm or not. Your doctor may take samples from the affected area for further testing to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment options include over the counter antifungal creams and oral antifungal medicines if needed.

Ringworm is a common skin infection. It’s not an actual worm, but a fungal infection. Ringworm commonly develops in warm, moist areas of the body, such as the groin and feet. The rash appears as red, circular patches with defined edges that may be flaky or scaly.

If you find a suspicious rash on your body, see your doctor to confirm it’s ringworm. You can treat most cases at home using over-the-counter antifungal medication for 2 weeks.

Wash and dry your feet thoroughly every day, especially between your toes.

Wear shower shoes or sandals when using public showers or locker rooms.

Wear moisture-wicking socks to avoid excess perspiration from accumulating in your shoes.

Change your socks every day to prevent moisture from building up in them overnight while they’re stuffed in your shoe.

Keep your feet dry by sprinkling over-the-counter antifungal powder into your shoes and socks before you wear them each day.

Avoid sharing towels, clothes or other personal items with anyone who has ringworm. This will help prevent spreading the infection to others and reinfecting yourself.*


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