Things You Can Do At Home To Improve Dark Circles Under The Eyes http


What is basal cell carcinoma?

Basal cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer that begins in the upper part of the epidermis, the outermost layer of the skin. The most common type of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma usually develops on sun-exposed sites such as the head and neck. Basal cell carcinomas often appear as a small, smooth bump on the skin, but they also can take many different forms, including open sores and waxy patches.

Basal cell carcinomas are rarely life-threatening, but they can become large and disfiguring if not treated promptly and appropriately. If left untreated or if allowed to grow, basal cell carcinomas can damage surrounding tissue and invade bones or other tissues beneath the skin. In rare cases, they may spread to other parts of the body.

What causes basal cell carcinoma?

Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light from sunlight or tanning beds is a major risk factor for all types of skin cancer. Some people are at higher risk for basal cell carcinoma than others because of their exposure to UV light over their lifetime. Basal cell carcinomas are more common in people with fair skin who freckle easily, have blond or red hair and blue eyes

Basal cell carcinoma is by far the most common form of skin cancer. It usually occurs on parts of the body that get a lot of sun exposure, such as the head and neck, but it can occur anywhere. It is slow growing, rarely fatal, and most often cured by simple surgical removal or other treatment. Yet it can be disfiguring if not treated early.

Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) begin in the basal cells, which are at the bottom of the epidermis (the outer layer of skin). The basal cells produce new skin cells as old ones die. This process keeps the skin thick, firm, smooth and able to heal after injury. Basal cell carcinoma can develop on areas of your skin with a lot of sun exposure or on areas that haven’t been exposed to the sun. Basal cell carcinomas usually develop on areas frequently exposed to the sun — particularly your face, ears and neck.

The most common sign of basal cell carcinoma is a waxy or pearly bump or nodule that develops on your face, ears, neck or hands — especially in areas frequently exposed to sunlight. These bumps might be pale, pink or brown and may have blood vessels visible through them. Sometimes the bumps look like

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a type of skin cancer. It is by far the most common type of skin cancer. BCCs are usually found on areas of the skin that are exposed to the sun, such as your face and neck. They often look like open sores, reddish patches, pink growths, shiny bumps, or scars. BCCs can be disfiguring if allowed to grow, but they are almost never fatal.

There are many types of BCC. Treatment depends on the specific type diagnosed and its size and location.

Basal cell carcinoma is a common type of skin cancer. It is also known as basal cell cancer.

Basal cell carcinomas typically appear as small, fleshy bumps or nodules on areas exposed to the sun, such as the face and neck. They are slow growing and rarely spread to other parts of the body (metastasize).

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a common type of skin cancer. Most basal cell skin cancers can be cured if they are found early.

The basal cells are a layer of cells that make new skin cells as the outer layer of skin is worn away or damaged. Basal cell carcinoma develops in the basal cells.

Basal cell carcinoma rarely spreads to other parts of the body (metastasizes). But it can cause damage to surrounding tissue.

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of skin cancer, with more than 4 million cases diagnosed in the United States each year. BCCs often appear as small, flesh-colored bumps or pink patches on sun-exposed skin areas, such as the face and neck. They can also look like a red patch or an open sore that doesn’t heal or bleeds easily. BCCs rarely spread to other parts of the body and can often be cured if they are found and treated early.

Although basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer, it rarely spreads (metastasizes) to other parts of the body. For this reason, basal cell carcinoma is considered a low-risk cancer. When basal cell carcinoma spreads to distant organs, it can be very hard to treat and may cause serious problems. It tends to run along nerves in its path from the skin to other parts of the body, causing damage along its way.

The most common symptom of basal cell carcinoma is a new growth that looks like a pearl-colored bump or nodule on your skin. It may be pearly or waxy in appearance. Sometimes this area develops into a painless open sore that doesn’t heal for weeks

Basal cell carcinoma is a type of cancer that begins in the basal cells — a type of cell within the skin that produces new skin cells as old ones die off. Basal cells are located in the lower or basal layer of the epidermis (the outermost layer of the skin).

Basal cell carcinoma often appears as a waxy bump on the sun-exposed skin of your face, head or neck. It may be pink, red or white. Over time, it can look like a scar and may be raised and scaly. Sometimes basal cell carcinoma spreads into surrounding tissues and forms a painful ulcer that frequently bleeds.

Although basal cell carcinoma rarely spreads to other parts of your body (metastasizes), it can be disfiguring if allowed to grow. Basal cell carcinomas are commonly found on areas exposed to sunlight, such as your face and neck, but can also occur on areas not ordinarily exposed to sun.

Risk factors include:

Age — most people who develop basal cell carcinomas do so after age 50; however, they can occur at any age

Light skin — people with fair skin have an increased risk; however, dark-skinned people can develop these cancers as well

Personal


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.