Lions, Tigers, & Bears (Oh my!)


Have you ever wondered what to do if you’re attacked by a lion, tiger, or bear? Well, we’re here to help.

Lions, Tigers, & Bears (Oh my!) is the number one blog on how to deal with the world’s most deadliest animals.

We go through each animal and explain what they do, where they live, and how to defend yourself against them.

Check out our latest blog post “What to do if you see a bear” below:

For the majority of people, having a run in with a lion, tiger or bear is a very rare occurrence. Of course there are always exceptions to this rule, but it is safe to say that for most of us, we will never be chased by wild animals. The following information is for those curious individuals who find themselves in an unexpected encounter with some of nature’s most deadliest predators.

Lion:

The lion is a large animal, weighing between 250 and 550 pounds. It is most often found in the African plains, but can also be found in India and various other locations around the world. Lions will often attack humans when they feel threatened. They usually target groups of people such as runners, bikers and hikers. If you find yourself near a lion, do not make eye contact. This may cause the lion to view you as a threat, which can trigger an attack. You should also avoid crouching down or bending over because these movements may be seen as threatening by the animal. In order to make yourself appear larger, raise your arms up above your head and wave your hands back and forth to make noise. Lions tend to avoid loud noises when hunting their prey so this strategy may work in your favor. When making noise, do not scream or cry out

Dermis is the second layer of your skin. It is a strong connective tissue that contains blood vessels, nerves, hair follicles and sweat glands. It is also where your tattoos and stretch marks come from. The dermis is tightly connected to the epidermis through a basement membrane. This means that when the epidermis changes, the dermis changes too. And when the dermis changes, so does the epidermis.

The dermis has two regions: papillary and reticular. The papillary region lies close to the surface of your skin while the reticular region lies below it. The papillary region is made up of loose connective tissue which contains capillaries (tiny blood vessels), small muscle fibers and lobules (small lobes) of fat cells. The papillary region also contains ridges and grooves which create fingerprints on our fingers and toes! These ridges are called Dermal Papillae and they anchor our skin to our muscles through collagen fibers.

The reticular region is much thicker than the papillary layer, but still thin compared to other parts of your body like your liver or heart! It’s made up of dense irregular connective tissue that contains many large bundles of collagen fibers as well as elastic

Dermis:

The dermis is the inner layer of the skin. It contains collagen, elastin and reticular fibers, hair follicles, muscle fibers, sensory nerves, blood vessels, sebaceous glands, sweat glands and lymphatic vessels. The dermis contains two layers; the papillary dermis and the reticular dermis.

Papillary Dermis:

The papillary dermis is the uppermost layer of the dermis. It is thin and has finger like extensions (dermal papillae) which push into the epidermis to anchor it to the dermis. It contains loose connective tissue that is permeated with lymphatic vessels and nerve endings. The papillary dermis allows nutrients from blood vessels to diffuse down through to the epidermal cells. It also contains blood vessels that supply nourishment to the other layers of skin and remove waste products from them.

Reticular Dermis:

The reticular dermis is the lower layer of skin under the papillary layer of skin. It contains dense irregular connective tissue which is tough and thick enough to withstand a great deal of stress without tearing or breaking. The reticular dermis contains hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous

The dermis is the layer of skin beneath the epidermis that consists of connective tissue and cushions the body from stress and strain. The dermis is tightly connected to the epidermis by a basement membrane. It also harbors many Mechanoreceptors that provide the sense of touch and heat. It contains the hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, apocrine glands, lymphatic vessels and blood vessels. The blood vessels in the dermis provide nourishment and waste removal from its own cells as well as from the stratum basale of the epidermis.

The main cell types are fibroblasts, macrophages and mast cells.

The term “derma” comes from Greek δέρμα (derma), which means “skin”.

The dermis is the second layer of skin. It ranges from 0.5mm to 3.0 mm in thickness and is composed of collagen, elastin, and reticular fibers, fibroblasts and other cells. The dermis provides tensile strength and elasticity to the skin through an extracellular matrix composed of collagen fibrils, microfibrils, and elastic fibers, embedded in hyaluronan and proteoglycans. The dermis houses many structures including blood vessels, nerves, hair follicles, smooth muscle, glands (sweat and oil), sensory receptors, lymphatic tissue and fat.

The epidermal-dermal boundary is supported by fingerlike projections called dermal papillae that extend downward into the uppermost layer of the dermis (the papillary layer). These projections contain blood vessels that provide nutrients to all layers of the epidermis. The blood vessels in the dermis supply nourishment and waste removal for both itself and the epidermis.

The reticular layer: the most dense layer of connective tissue within the skin; composed primarily of irregularly arranged collagen fibers with fibroblast cells dispersed throughout this region. This layer is responsible for providing much of the tensile strength to

The dermis is the layer of skin beneath the epidermis that consists of connective tissue and cushions the body from stress and strain. The dermis is tightly connected to the epidermis by a basement membrane. It also harbors many Mechanoreceptors that provide the sense of touch and heat. It contains the hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, apocrine glands, lymphatic vessels, nerves and blood vessels. The blood vessels in the dermis provide nourishment and waste removal from its own cells as well as from the Stratum basale of the epidermis. The dermis is made up of an irregularly arranged connective tissue composed of collagen fibers, extrafibrillar matrix, and adnexal structures (such as hair follicles) embedded in a watery intercellular matrix known as ground substance.

The main type of cells found in the dermis are fibroblasts; they produce the tough collagen fibers as well as an extracellular matrix rich in glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and proteoglycans (PGs), which support epithelial structures above. Blood vessels may be visible on the surface, appearing like tiny red lines; these are called telangi


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