The 4 Most Common Types of Skin Cancer


The 4 Most Common Types of Skin Cancer

April 17, 2018

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. More than 3.5 million skin cancers in over two million people are diagnosed annually. The three most common types of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and melanoma.

Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

About 80% of all skin cancers are BCCs, according to the American Cancer Society. This type of cancer develops from the basal cells, which line the deepest layer of the epidermis, the outermost layer of skin, and produce new skin cells as old cells die off. Basal cell carcinomas are typically caused by a combination of cumulative and intense, occasional sun exposure. Other factors that may increase your risk include fair skin, blue or green eyes and blond or red hair.

Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC)

Squamous cell carcinomas arise in the squamous cells that make up most of the skin’s upper layers. They are often found on sun-exposed areas like the ears, face, lips and back of hands. These cancers can also develop on areas that have been injured or burned or where

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. In fact, the incidence of skin cancer cases each year is higher than all other cancer types combined. One in five Americans will develop skin cancer at some point in their lives, but with early detection and removal, it is almost always curable.

The most common types of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma and merkel cell carcinoma. The earlier these conditions are detected and treated, the better your chance of a cure. Learn more about these four types of skin cancers below and talk to our dermatologist Dr. Chimento if you have any questions or concerns.

Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of skin cancer and accounts for about 80 percent of non-melanoma skin cancers. BCCs tend to grow slowly over months or years and rarely spread to other areas of the body (metastasize). They are often found on areas that get a lot of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun or tanning beds, such as the face, neck and ears. Even though BCCs rarely spread to other parts of the body, they can still be dangerous

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. This year, an estimated 5.6 million cases of non-melanoma skin cancer will be treated in more than 3 million people. That estimate includes more than 2 million cases of basal cell cancer and more than 3 million cases of squamous cell cancer. The two most common types of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

The majority of skin cancers are caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds, and can be prevented by limiting your exposure to UV radiation. In addition, it’s important to protect yourself from the sun with a broad-spectrum sunscreen that protects against UVA and UVB rays. In general, UVA rays age skin, while UVB rays burn skin — both play a role in skin cancer development.

Here are four types of non-melanoma skin cancers you should know about:

Basal Cell Carcinoma

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Kaposi Sarcoma

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States with more than 3.5 million people affected this year. There are four main types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), melanoma, and merkel cell carcinoma.

Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC)

The most common type of skin cancer, BCC affects approximately 2 million Americans every year. It is a slow-growing cancer that begins in the basal cells, which line the deepest layer of the epidermis, and rarely spreads to other areas of the body. The majority of BCC cases can be cured if they are detected in the early stages.

Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC)

SCC is one of the two most common types of skin cancers and usually develops on areas exposed to the sun such as the ears, face, lips, and back of hands. It can also develop elsewhere on your body including areas that have been previously injured or burned or have undergone long-term exposure to a weak acid or alkaline substance. SCC can be cured if detected early but can also spread to other parts of your body and become life-threatening if not treated promptly.

Most people know that having a tan is bad for your skin, but many people still spend time in the sun without protecting their skin with sunscreen or sunblock. In addition to causing wrinkles and premature aging of the skin, exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays causes 90% of the visible changes commonly attributed to skin aging.

Over time, unprotected exposure to UV rays can cause skin cancer. The most dangerous type of skin cancer is melanoma, which occurs when pigment-producing cells in the skin become cancerous and multiply out of control. In 2013, an estimated 76,690 Americans will be diagnosed with melanoma and 9,480 will die from this disease. This year alone, more than 2 million Americans are expected to develop basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), two other types of skin cancer.

Fortunately, early detection and treatment of these three most common types of skin cancer provides a good chance of cure.

There are several different types of skin cancer, each of which can look different on the skin. This picture guide will help you identify the differences between them.

Melanoma

Melanoma accounts for only 1 percent of skin cancers, yet it causes a large majority of skin cancer deaths. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2018, there will be about 91,270 new melanomas diagnosed in the US and about 9,320 people will die of melanoma.

This type of skin cancer is caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from either the sun or tanning beds. It starts in skin cells called melanocytes and typically begins appearing on the body as a new spot or a change in an existing mole. These spots are usually brown or black, but some can appear pink, tan, or even white.

In its early stages, melanoma is almost always curable. But if it’s not caught early, the cancer can advance and spread to other parts of the body. The best way to prevent melanoma is to protect yourself from UV rays by limiting your time in the sun and wearing sunscreen every day.

Melanoma can develop anywhere on your body but is most likely to begin on the trunk (in men) or legs (in women

The epidermis is the outermost layer of the three layers that make up the skin. It acts as a barrier, protecting the body from the external environment. The epidermis is made up of different types of cells, all of which are formed from the lowest level of epidermal cells, called basal cells. These cells are also known as keratinocytes and they produce keratin, a type of protein that is a major component of skin, hair and nails. In addition to keratinocytes, there are also other cell types in the epidermis including melanocytes, Langerhans’ cells and Merkel’s cells.

Melanocytes are found at the base of the epidermis and their main function is to produce melanin, a pigment that gives skin its colour. Melanin has an important protective function because it absorbs harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation from solar radiation and prevents damage to underlying skin tissue. As we age or become exposed to sunlight over time, melanocytes can become cancerous and develop into melanoma. Melanoma is one of four common types of skin cancer.

Langerhans’ cells are immune system cells that help protect us from infection by recognising foreign substances such as bacteria and viruses. Once these invaders


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