What is pityriasis versicolor? Pityriasis versicolor is also called ‘tinea versicolor’. Here’s what you need to know about pityriasis versicolor.


What is pityriasis versicolor?

Pityriasis versicolor is also called ‘tinea versicolor’. It is a harmless fungal infection of the skin. It is caused by a yeast infection and can affect people of all ages.

The condition is not contagious and does not spread from person to person. The infection usually occurs on the neck, upper back, chest or upper arms, but it can spread to other parts of the body.

What are the symptoms of pityriasis versicolor?

The most common symptom of pityriasis versicolor is pale-brown scaly patches on your skin. These patches are often slightly darker or lighter than your normal skin colour. They may be pink or tan, and can be itchy or cause no discomfort.

How is pityriasis versicolor diagnosed?

A doctor will examine your skin to check for scaly patches. He/she may also look at tissue under a microscope to find out if there are any yeast cells present in your skin.

Pityriasis versicolor (tinea versicolor) is a skin condition caused by a yeast infection. It causes small patches of skin to become scaly and discoloured.

It’s not contagious and can affect people of all ages. The patches tend to be more visible on areas of the body that get a lot of sun, such as the face, neck, shoulders and upper arms.

Pityriasis versicolor isn’t normally painful or itchy, and isn’t harmful, but the discoloured patches can sometimes cause distress.

The patches usually become less noticeable in winter and may fade completely in summer months when there’s more sunlight.

Pityriasis versicolor (also known as tinea versicolor) is a common fungal infection of the skin. It appears on the chest and back, and sometimes in other areas. But it is not contagious.

The fungus that causes pityriasis versicolor lives on normal skin all the time. However, if you have had pityriasis versicolor before, you are more likely to get it again. People with oily skin are more susceptible to this fungal infection.

Pityriasis versicolor commonly affects teenagers and young adults, especially during hot, humid weather. It can also affect children under five years and adults over 50 years of age. It is rare in babies.

Pityriasis versicolor is a condition where patches of skin become scaly and discoloured. The patches are usually light brown, pink or red and can be lighter or darker than the surrounding skin. They usually affect the back, chest, neck and upper arms.

Pityriasis versicolor is common and often affects teenagers and young adults. It isn’t serious but can cause embarrassment.

Pityriasis versicolor is a common skin condition that’s usually harmless. It causes patches of skin to become scaly and discoloured.

Pityriasis versicolor isn’t contagious, so it can’t be passed on to other people.

The patches are usually found on the chest and back, but may spread to other areas of the body.

They’re often white or light brown and can be itchy or sore in some cases.

Pityriasis versicolor is fairly common, affecting around one in 20 people at some point in their lives.

Pityriasis versicolor is a common fungal infection of the skin. It causes small, discoloured patches that usually appear on the chest and back. The patches may be lighter or darker than the surrounding skin. However, pityriasis versicolor can affect any part of the body.

Most people experience a mild form of pityriasis versicolor with only a few small patches developing on their skin. In severe cases, more extensive areas of skin are affected.

Pityriasis versicolor isn’t contagious and doesn’t cause any serious health problems, but some people may feel self-conscious about its appearance.

The infection is caused by the overgrowth of a yeast-like fungi called Malassezia that naturally occurs on the skin.The fungi doesn’t cause any harm, but when the skin becomes excessively oily these fungi colonies multiply and begin to dominate.Pityriasis versicolor is not infectious and can’t be passed on from person to person or from one part of your own body to another. The yeast that causes tinea versicolor lives naturally on your skin, so even if you treat it, it’s likely to return at some point. It gets worse in hot weather.


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