Why does my skin always feel dry? A blog about why your skin feels so dry. With a list of the main ingredients to help solve this dilemma.


Have you ever wondered why your skin always feel dry? Well, everyone’s skin is different, some people have sensitive skin that requires more attention than others. Here are the main ingredients that can help solve this dilemma:

1. Oil (vitamin E)

2. Water

3. Moisturizer

4. Creams

5. Scrubs

6. Gel

7. Spray (sunscreen)

Skin is the largest organ in your body, and it is extremely important to take care of it. It is crucial to understand what products help keep your skin healthy and moist.

There are five layers of skin, but the ones that are important for moisture are the epidermis, dermis, and subcutis. The epidermis has 5 layers that help protect your body from the environment. The top layer of the epidermis is called stratum corneum. This layer acts as a waterproof barrier to the rest of your body. These cells are constantly regenerating; they push older cells outwards towards the surface of your skin where they eventually die and rub off. The cells that make up this top layer have no blood vessels in them, so they rely on diffusion from deeper layers to get nutrients. Without proper hydration and nourishment, these cells will become dry, rough and flaky.

The dermis is underneath the epidermis and is made up of collagen fibers which give our skin its structure and strength. Without proper moisture, this layer will also lead to dry skin because the collagen fibers will stick together with each other which will make our skin look wrinkly and saggy (ew).

The subcutaneous layer is underneath the dermis

The skin is the largest organ of the body and it has several functions. It helps to regulate body temperature, protect internal organs, and acts as a barrier against disease-causing organisms. The skin does this by forming a protective layer called the stratum corneum or horny layer. This layer comprises about 15% of the thickness of your skin.

The top most layers of your skin form this protective layer and it is composed of dead cells which are held together by lipids or fats that are secreted from between cells. When these lipids become depleted because of aging, chemicals, and weather conditions your skin will feel dry and tight. Dry skin has a rough texture; fine lines may appear and in severe cases cracks can develop (fissures) or scales (hyperkeratosis). Dry skin can affect any part of the body but is more prevalent on the arms, hands, legs and abdomen.

There are many causes for dry skin but here are some common ones:

The epidermis is the outermost of the three layers that make up the skin, the inner layers being the dermis and hypodermis. The epidermis layer provides a barrier to infection from environmental pathogens and regulates the amount of water released from the body into the atmosphere through transepidermal water loss. The epidermis is composed of multiple layers of flattened cells that overlie a base layer composed of columnar cells arranged perpendicularly. Some types of skin such as that on the palms and soles are thicker and have five epidermal layers instead of four.

The main type of cells which make up the epidermis are Merkel cells, keratinocytes, with melanocytes and Langerhans cells also present. The epidermis can be further subdivided into the following strata (beginning with the outermost layer): corneum, lucidum (only in palms and soles), granulosum, spinosum, basale. Cells are formed through mitosis at the basale layer.

Corneocytes: flat, scale-like dead cells comprising most of the thickness of the stratum corneum (the “horny” or waterproof outermost layer)

Melanocytes: synthesize melanin

The epidermis is the outermost layer of the skin. The skin’s main function is to act as a protective barrier that interacts with a sometimes-hostile environment. One important aspect of this interaction is the prevention of excessive fluid loss. In humans, the skin accounts for about 7 percent of body weight, which is composed of 65 percent water, making it the largest organ in the body.

The epidermis contains no blood vessels, and is nourished by diffusion from the dermis. The main type of cells which make up the epidermis are Merkel cells, keratinocytes, with melanocytes and Langerhans cells also present. The epidermis can be further subdivided into the following strata (beginning with the outermost layer): corneum, lucidum (only in palms of hands and soles of feet), granulosum, spinosum, basale. Cells are formed through mitosis at the basale layer. Different types of cell are formed through differentiation in a downwards direction until they reach the corneum and are shed off (desquamation). This process is called keratinization and takes place within weeks.

In addition to keratinocytes, melanocytes are present in the epidermis. Mel

Epidermis is the outermost layer of skin. It forms a protective barrier over the body’s surface, responsible for keeping water in the body and preventing penetration of pathogens. The main type of cells making up the epidermis are keratinocytes, melanocytes, Langerhans cells and Merkel cells.

The outermost layer of the epidermis consists of 25 to 30 layers of dead cells, which overlie 8 to 10 layers of living basal cells, at the lowest level of the epidermis. The dead cells are continuously shed from the epidermis’s outer surface (the stratum corneum) and are replaced by progeny of the basal cells.

Melanin pigments give human skin its color. These pigments are produced by melanocytes that reside in the basal cell layer. In dark-skinned people, melanosomes (the organelle containing pigment granules) in melanocytes cover most of the keratinocytes and prevent light from penetrating into lower layers. In light-skinned people, melanosomes cover only about one-third to one-half of each keratinocyte and are separated by large unpigmented spaces through which light can penetrate easily.

The epidermis is the outermost of the three layers that make up the skin, the inner layers being the dermis and hypodermis. The epidermis layer provides a barrier to infection from environmental pathogens and regulates the amount of water released from the body into the atmosphere through transepidermal water loss. The epidermis is composed of multiple layers of flattened cells that overlie a base layer (stratum basale) composed of columnar cells arranged perpendicularly. The rows of cells develop from stem cells in the basal layer. Cellular mechanisms for regulating water and sodium levels are found in all layers of the epidermis. The word “epidermis” is derived through Latin from ancient Greek epi-, meaning over or upon and derma, meaning skin.

In humans, it is only about as thick as paper (0.05-0.1 mm), yet its surface area amounts to nearly 1m^2 (~=10 sq ft). The epidermis contains no blood vessels, and is nourished almost exclusively by diffused oxygen from the surrounding air. It consists of stratified squamous epithelium with an underlying basal lamina. Corneocytes are cell fragments whose cytoplasm is packed with keratin fil


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