Young and Non-Melanoma Skin Cancers – The Differences, Treatments, Symptoms


Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common form of skin cancer. It is often found on the outside of the ears, lower lip, face, neck and back of hands, and arms. The UV rays from the sun are a major cause for this type of cancer. SCC can also be found in areas of your body not exposed to the sun like: genitals, anus and mouth.

If you have been diagnosed with SCC, it is important to know that there are different types of squamous cell carcinoma. Sometimes these cancers are more aggressive than others. Knowing what type of cancer you have will help your doctor determine the best treatment options for you.

It is important to note that it is not a good idea to self-diagnose or attempt to self-treat any type of skin cancer or precancerous lesion. You should always see a board certified dermatologist if you suspect that you may have a type of skin cancer or precancerous lesion.

Squamous cell carcinoma may start in any part of the body covered by a type of skin cell called squamous cells.

This is the second most common form of skin cancer but luckily, it is generally less aggressive than melanoma.

It is more common in men, and in people of African descent. It can occur in transplant patients who are on immunosuppressive drugs like Cyclosporin. Squamous cell carcinoma can develop on damaged skin, for example after burns or other injuries to the skin.

They can also be due to chronic sun exposure (UV light), especially in fair-skinned people. This is why they are often seen on the face and ears of elderly people.

Squamous cell carcinoma may also develop from actinic keratosis (sun damage) and xerosis (dry skin).

A squamous cell carcinoma may appear as a scaly pinkish patch or lump that doesn’t heal. Once it has become quite large, it may bleed and then crust over, only to bleed again when knocked or scratched.

Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common form of skin cancer. This cancer occurs when squamous cells (thin, flat cells that make up most of the outer layer of skin) begin to grow out of control. It usually appears on areas of the body most exposed to the sun, such as your scalp, face, lips and ears, but can also be found in non-sun exposed areas such as your palms and genital areas.

It typically presents as a sore or lump that bleeds or crusts over before healing and then returns again. It also appears as a firm red nodule or flat lesion with scaly, crusted surface. Squamous cell carcinomas may have a raised edge with a lower area in the center that has an indented (“craterlike”) appearance. If left untreated it will continue to grow in size and may become disfiguring and possibly spread to other parts of your body.

Squamous cell carcinoma spreads more aggressively than basal cell carcinoma but generally responds well to treatment if caught early enough. Though it is less common than basal cell carcinoma it is much more likely to spread (metastasize) to other parts of your body where it may become more difficult to treat successfully, especially if not caught

Squamous cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer. It appears as a firm, red nodule, which is often tender to the touch. It may also be scaly or crusted. In most cases, squamous cell carcinoma first appears on sun-exposed areas such as the face, lips, ears, neck, hands and arms.

Squamous cell carcinomas are often slow growing and can ulcerate or bleed easily. Sometimes they resemble a patch of eczema or psoriasis.

In very rare cases they can spread to other parts of the body and become life-threatening.

The Cancer Council recommends that if you have any suspicious spots anywhere on your body get them checked by your doctor immediately.

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a type of skin cancer. It begins in the squamous cells, which are the thin, flat cells that make up most of the outer layer of the skin (epidermis). The epidermis is made up of three types of cells: squamous cells, basal cells and melanocytes.

Squamous cell carcinoma usually occurs on areas of sun-damaged skin such as the rim of the ear, lower lip, face, bald scalp, neck, hands and arms. But it can occur anywhere on the body.

It is more common in men than women and in older people than younger people. People with fair skin are at higher risk. It can also affect dark skinned people if they have had long-term sun exposure.

Skin cancer is more common in fair complected individuals and those with a history of sunburns. There are also other factors that can increase an individual’s risk for developing skin cancer, such as a family history of skin cancer, previous radiation therapy to the head or neck region, a weakened immune system (such as from HIV), or the presence of precancerous lesions or xeroderma pigmentosum.

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a type of skin cancer that begins in the squamous cells, which compose the middle and outer layers of the skin. SCC is the second most common type of skin cancer and often occurs on areas of the body that get frequent exposure to the sun.

Symptoms include:

-A persistent scaly patch or lump that may bleed easily

-A wart-like growth with raised edges and crusted surface

-An open sore that doesn’t heal and bleeds easily

-A reddish patch or irritated area that might crust or itch but does not heal

Because SCC can be locally destructive if left untreated, it is important to see your dermatologist for regular screenings so any signs of skin cancer can be detected early and treated promptly. If you have any suspicious spots on

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a type of cancer that begins in the squamous cells, which are thin, flat cells that look like fish scales. They are found in the tissue that forms the surface of the skin, the lining of the hollow organs of the body, and the passages of the respiratory and digestive tracts.

It occurs most often in areas exposed to the sun, such as the rim of the ear, face, lips, and back of hands. SCC is more common in people who are fair-skinned or who have been exposed to chemotherapy drugs or radiation. It is also more common in people with a weakened immune system caused by organ transplant, AIDS or certain medicines used to treat cancer.


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