Molluscum Stock Photos


Molluscum Stock Photos: A blog that points to stock photos of molluscum for designers and marketers.

I’ve been working on a new project, Molluscum Stock Photos. It’s a blog that points out and comments on molluscum stock photography. I’m hoping to publish it tomorrow, but in the meantime, I wanted to tell a few people about it.

A little background: I have an older brother who lives in Seattle. He works at Getty Images. In the fall of 2005 he sent me a few articles about how Getty Images was starting their own stock photo blog, called “Stock Photo Talk.”

I read the articles, but didn’t spend much time thinking about them. The first article was just a press release from Getty, so there wasn’t any real news there. And the second article was mostly just repeating what Getty had said in their press release with some quotes from my brother added in.

But I couldn’t help thinking that this was either going to fail completely or be really big. And if it did take off, there would be lots of imitators soon after. So I opened up Google Blog Search and set up a feed for [stock photo].

Molluscum Stock Photos is a blog that points to stock photos of molluscum for designers and marketers.

You can submit your own molluscum pictures for inclusion in the blog using this form:

We don’t promise to include every picture, but we’ll try to be reasonably comprehensive.

A blog that points to stock photos of molluscum for designers and marketers.

This is a blog that points to stock photos of molluscum for designers and marketers.

I don’t have a blog. I just wanted to find some photos, but it was hard. So here they are so I can find them again later.

molluscum stock photos

viral skin disease molluscum contagiosum

Molluscum is a virus that causes small, benign bumps to form on the top layers of skin. It is most commonly found among children and young adults, but people of all ages can contract it. The condition is painless and does not cause any other symptoms besides the skin bumps. Usually molluscum goes away by itself in 6-12 months. However, it can take longer; some cases last up to four years. For this reason, many people choose to treat the condition with prescription medication or an over-the-counter treatment.

Molluscum contagiosum is easily transmitted through direct contact with an infected person or object, such as a towel or toy. It is also possible to get the virus if you touch an infected area and then touch your own skin elsewhere on your body. Because the virus spreads so easily, molluscum contagiosum can be difficult to prevent once it has spread in a household. If you have molluscum contagiosum, do not share toys, towels, or other personal items with other members of your household until all signs of infection have cleared up completely.

If you suspect that you or your child may have contracted molluscum contagiosum, find a dermatologist near you


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