What Is Vitiligo? A blog about the condition called vitiligo. The blog should be informative and easy to read.


What Is Vitiligo?

Vitiligo is a condition in which the skin loses its pigment cells (melanocytes). This can result in discolored patches in different areas of the body, including the hair and the inside of the mouth.

The exact cause of vitiligo is unknown. Some people get vitiligo after they have experienced a physical trauma like severe sunburn or cuts. Others might get it as a result of an autoimmune disease. In vitiligo, the immune system attacks and destroys melanocytes. In addition to scarring or trauma, other factors like emotional stress, environmental exposure and genetics may play a role in triggering vitiligo.

The condition is not contagious and does not cause physical discomfort. However, it can be emotionally unsettling for those who are affected by it.

There are four main types of vitiligo: segmental, focal, mucosal and acrofacial or linear. Segmental vitiligo affects one side or section of the body that is randomly distributed on both sides (bilateral). Focal vitiligo affects one or a few areas of the body that are round (circular) or oval (elliptical) in shape. Mucosal vitiligo only

Vitiligo is a condition in which the skin loses its pigment cells (melanocytes). This results in smooth, white patches appearing on the skin in different parts of the body. Similar patches also appear on both the mucous membranes (tissues that line the inside of the mouth and nose) and the retina (inner layer of the eyeball).

The hair that grows on areas affected by vitiligo sometimes turns white.

The cause of vitiligo is unknown, but research suggests that it may arise from autoimmune, genetic, oxidative stress, neural, or viral causes. The disorder is more noticeable in people with darker skin. There is no known cure for vitiligo. However, there are treatments that can help even out skin tone.

About Vitiligo

Vitiligo affects 0.5 to 1 percent of the world’s population. It affects all ethnic groups equally and men and women equally. The condition usually first appears between ages 10 to 30 but can begin at any age.

Vitiligo is a condition in which white patches develop on the skin. Any location on the body can be affected, and most people with vitiligo have white patches (depigmentation) in many areas. The hair that grows from the skin in areas affected by vitiligo sometimes turns white.

The cause of vitiligo is unknown, but research suggests that it may arise from autoimmune, genetic, oxidative stress, neural, or viral causes. The disorder affects people of all skin types, but it may be more noticeable in people with darker skin. The severity of vitiligo is unpredictable; it can remain stable for years without progressing, but sometimes it spreads rapidly.

Vitiligo is a disorder that causes patches of light skin. The patches occur when melanocytes, the cells that make pigment (color) in your skin, die or stop producing melanin — the pigment that gives your skin, hair and eyes color.

The exact cause of vitiligo is unknown. It may be an autoimmune condition in which your immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys certain cells within your body. Or it could be triggered by a trigger event, such as sunburn or emotional distress.

Vitiligo affects people of all skin types. It’s more noticeable in people with darker skin. There’s no cure for vitiligo. But treatment can help even out the color of your skin and sometimes return some pigment to your white patches.

If you have vitiligo, you may feel self-conscious about how it looks, especially if it’s on exposed areas of your body, such as your face, hands or arms. Treatment can help minimize its appearance and give you back some sense of control over how you look.

Vitiligo signs and symptoms

Vitiligo is a skin condition that causes lighter patches to form on the body. It occurs when cells that produce melanin, or the pigment that gives our skin its color, start to die. Vitiligo can affect anyone. A person’s race has nothing to do with it. Although vitiligo can occur at any age, most people notice symptoms before they are 20 years old.

Most people with vitiligo have white patches on several different parts of their body. These patches may be small or large and may join together. The hair from the scalp, eyelashes, eyebrows, and beard may also turn white. The inside of the mouth and nose may become darker in color.

The cause of vitiligo is unknown, but it may be an autoimmune disease. “Autoimmune” means your immune system mistakenly attacks some part of your own body by accident. It is also possible that one or more genes may make a person more likely to get the disorder.

Vitiligo affects all races equally; however, it tends to be more noticeable in people with darker skin because the contrast between their normal skin color and the affected area is greater. It is not contagious (catching).

Vitiligo is a skin condition characterized by patches of the skin losing their pigment. The extent and rate of color loss from vitiligo is unpredictable. It can affect the skin on any part of your body. It may also affect hair and the inside of the mouth.

The exact cause of vitiligo is unknown, but doctors believe it may arise from auto-immune, genetic, oxidative stress, neural or viral causes. Vitiligo affects people of all skin types, but it may be more noticeable in people with darker skin. The condition is not life-threatening or contagious. There is no known cure for vitiligo. However, treatment can prevent or slow the progression of color loss and improve the appearance of affected areas of skin.

Vitiligo is a skin condition in which the pigment cells, melanocytes, are destroyed in certain areas of the skin, causing depigmentation. Although it is usually not harmful, vitiligo can be a source of psychological stress.

The cause of vitiligo is unknown, but research suggests that it may arise from autoimmune, genetic, oxidative stress, neurological or viral causes. The treatment for vitiligo includes medications and surgical procedures.

At present there is no way to prevent vitiligo; however, early treatment may prevent further depigmentation.


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